Fitness
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Your body seeks equilibrium

The best workout eventually becomes routine. Here’s how to challenge yourself.

photos_articles_05.jpgYour body is a survival vessel for all those genes you are carrying around. One of the ways it looks after itself is by seeking stability.

After the Big Bang, quarks (the smallest things imaginable) began to seek constancy. They combined into larger particles that eventually led to the creation of elements and molecules.

The point is that the organic and inorganic matter in our world seeks stability. And so does your body. When it is stressed, it adapts. Look at runners: their calves are usually stronger and more defined than average.

If you put a 15-pound weight in your hand and curl it towards you 15 times three times a week, lo and behold it gradually becomes easier. Your body adapts. It survives. It is resilient.

Time Out!

Take the time to close your eyes for five seconds and tell yourself this: I am a survivor. My body is strong. I will live long and be healthy.

Good work. Sending positive messages like this from your conscious mind to your unconscious helps your body to heal and be healthier. It is a worthwhile exercise.

Remember, any workout program will become obsolete. Maybe not in a day, maybe not for months–but your body will adapt as it becomes stronger. This means you will have to change your program to encourage development. Challenge yourself!

When you perform progressive resistance training you want it to be really hard at the end of each exercise. For instance, if you are doing an arm exercise fifteen times, you want the last three times you perform it to be really hard to do. At the same time, you want to focus your mind on the muscle group you are working.

There’s good pain and bad pain. You know the difference. There’s the burning feeling when your arms are above your head changing a light bulb (good pain), and there’s the sharp pain when you stub your toe (bad pain). Work through the good pain and stop when you feel bad pain.

The following are advanced routines that many athletes use. The remarkable thing is that they can be applied to just about any fitness level. The idea is to separate body parts into sections so you can really work a section and then rest it. It takes a day, two, three, or four or more for your muscles to recover. So the idea is to mix it up.

Here are a couple of workout variations for you to consider:

“Opposites Attract” Program

This workout is based on separating the pulling movements from the pushing movements. This keeps the body rested and helps prevent injuries. Because this schedule is spread over four days it allows for shorter exercise periods. This exercise plan is a proven winner. Keep in mind that the body seeks stability and will eventually adapt to this schedule, so you will need to change it up.

  • Day one: Exercise chest and back. Mix it up. Perform one chest exercise for the full number of sets and then move to back, and so on.
  • Day two: Exercise legs. Work the front (quads), back (hams) and calves.
  • Day three: Exercise shoulders. Make sure you work both the front of your shoulders and rear deltoid exercises. Remember to perform rotator cuff training! It will protect your shoulder over the long term.
  • Day four: Exercise arms. Switch from biceps to triceps. If you have time, perform some forearm exercises.

Once or twice a week add in abdominals and twenty minutes of cardiovascular exercise. See cardiovascular stories on this website links.

Every day make sure you warm up for at least 10 minutes and perform a complete body stretch before exercising. Cool down after your workout and try to get more stretching in to help prevent injury and aid development.

This program is also designed to stretch your muscles. For instance, when you work your back, you are also stretching.

“Dynamic Synergy” Program

This program builds strength and an incredible level of fitness. It’s unique because it sets all the pushing movements together and all the pulling movements together. It pushes the envelope of your workout because your body will be fatigued from performing these movements together. Make sure you perform the exercises in the order prescribed below.

  • Day one: Exercise back first, then biceps, and then hamstrings. These are all your bodies pushing movements together. You need to work your back before your biceps, because when you work back you work both the biceps and back. Therefore you need to keep your biceps fresh so you can complete your back workout.
  • Day two: Exercise chest, shoulders and triceps. Perform the exercises in this order. This allows you to work all the muscles in progression. These are all your upper body pushing movements.
  • Day three: Exercise quads and calves. These are all the pushing movements for your legs.

Once or twice a week add in abdominals and twenty minutes of cardiovascular exercise. See cardiovascular stories on the website links.

Every day make sure you warm up for at least 10 minutes and perform a complete body stretch before exercising. Make sure you cool down after your workout and try to get more stretching in to help prevent injury and aid development.

Remember, your body is seeking equilibrium. You can take advantage of this by challenging yourself with these unique workouts and greater intensity.

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