Learn the pros, cons, and safe ways to remove meat products from your diet.

Photo by Chantal Garnier on Unsplash

WHAT IS A PLANT-BASED DIET?

These vegan-like diets eliminate all animal products, including meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy and honey. As the name suggests, everything you eat, including whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, is derived from plants.

ARE PLANT-BASED DIETS HEALTHY?

Research reflects that following a plant-based diet has significant health benefits as long as you do it correctly.

“No matter when you start, a diet that is focused on plant foods will help you work toward the prevention of many illnesses and feeling better overall,” Julia Zumpano says.

If followed properly, a whole food, plant-based diet limits the use of oils, added sugars and processed foods. Leaving only whole foods to provide nutrition. This maximizes nutrient intake and virtually eliminates foods that can lead to poor health outcomes.

These diets are low in saturated fat, free of cholesterol and rich in fibre, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

Research also reveals that following this type of diet will lower your risks of:

Heart disease
High blood pressure Diabetes
Digestive diseases
Colon and breast cancers Obesity

Studies also show that a plant-based diet can help to lower body weight and reduce your LDL cholesterol.

THE CONS OF A PLANT-BASED DIET

Following a plant-based diet means saying goodbye to all animal products, including lean meat and dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese and ice cream.

“That’s easier said than done for many of us,” Kate Patton says. “But when you have the right guidelines and wrap in changes over time, replacing animal products in your diet is possible.”

Another thing to note: if you don’t plan your plant-based diet correctly, you may not meet all of your protein, vitamin and mineral needs. And you won’t feel or look your best if you develop a nutritional deficiency. But there are easy ways to make sure you’re getting the nutrients you need.

HOW TO GET ENOUGH PROTEIN

You’ll want to make sure that your diet includes enough protein to maintain muscle mass, strong bones and healthy skin. The following foods are packed with protein:

Beans, lentils and split peas quinoa, soy products like tempeh, tofu, soybeans and soymilk, nuts and seeds

HOW TO GET ENOUGH VITAMINS AND MINERALS

You’ll also need to get adequate calcium and vitamin D in your diet to ensure healthy bones. This won’t be difficult if you:

Drink a milk alternative such as soy, almond, rice or hemp milk which contain both calcium and the vitamin D needed to absorb it.

Eat plenty of dark green leafy lettuce and beans which contain calcium. Eat mushrooms and fortified cereals which contain vitamin D. If you aren’t consuming fortified foods on a daily basis, you’ll need to take a vitamin D supplement. Sunlight is another source of vitamin D.

You’ll also need enough zinc in your diet to support a healthy immune system, enough iron to maintain energy and immunity and enough vitamin B12 to produce red blood cells and prevent anemia. This means you’ll want to:

Eat whole grains, beans and fortified cereals for zinc and iron.

Eat fortified cereals and soy products to get your vitamin B12.

Nutritional yeast is also a great source of vitamin B12.

HOW TO GET STARTED ON A PLANT-BASED DIET

“To start your pant-based diet, keep it simple. Begin by cutting out one animal products at a time,” Patton says.

First, replace all milk and dairy products with soy, rice, almond and hemp alternatives. Use non-dairy yogurt or kefir and soy or coconut- milk coffee creamer.

Next, replace chicken, turkey, beef, pork, veal, lamb and fish with plant proteins.

Stock up on legumes, beans, nuts, seeds and vegan meat alternatives like tofu, veggie burgers, nutritional yeast, seitan and tempeh.

Be sure to include all four food groups in each meal — plant protein, fruit, vegetables and whole grain — as shown in the following sample menu.

SAMPLE ONE-DAY PLANT-BASED VEGAN MENU

BREAKFAST:

1 cup cooked steel cut oats
mixed with 1/8 cup chopped nuts, 1⁄2 cup fresh berries, 1⁄2 cup pureed pumpkin or butternut squash and 1 tablespoon of group flaxseed.

1 cup soymilk

SNACK:

Dairy free yogurt or kefir

LUNCH:

Veggie burrito (whole grain tortilla spread with vegan refried beans stuffed with mixed greens, tomatoes, peppers, onions and nutritional yeast).

1 ounce of corn tortilla chips Fresh salsa or guacamole

SNACK:

1 apple with 1 tablespoon natural peanut butter

DINNER:

Tofu stir fry with brown rice and choice of veggies — snap peas, carrots, onions, broccoli, spinach
— water chestnuts and/or sliced almonds, sauteed in vegetable broth or 1 tablespoon olive, canola, sesame or peanut oil.

DESSERT:

1⁄2 cup of sorbet topped with
1 cup tropical fruit salad — mango, pineapple, melon.

“Once you begin, in time you’ll fill your kitchen with what you need, and it will get easier every day. A plant-based diet may seem restrictive, but you can look at it as a simpler way of eating,” Zumpano says.

Discover More: Check out this helpful article on understanding which supplements are best.

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