For decades now, they’ve been called “sex toys” and some are more toy-like, but now we’re starting to see more sexual health devices hit the market, designed by women, for women, backed by science. Some are even gender neutral. The point is, they’re not toys. They’re finally being recognized as a key part of women and men’s overall sexual health.

This year, sexual health technology was quite prominent at the world’s largest consumer technology show, CES or Consumer Electronics Show, which takes place in Las Vegas in January. It’s the place for any serious technology company to launch their latest and greatest gadget. So we took a look at what was front and centre for sexual health tech this past January and how this market is finally coming out from under the sheets.

In 2019, sex tech company Lora DiCarlo had their robotic massager, Osé banned from CES as being “immoral” and award they’d recieved was recinded. As early as 2017, men were able to watch porn on Virtual Reality goggles, but feminine sex tech was banned. Surprised? We weren’t. After the event of 2019, there was such a huge outcry against the organisers of CES and their unsurprising actions, that they gave back the award they’d taken from Lora DiCarlo and re-instated sex tech under the category of health and wellness. About time.

This year Lora DiCarlo were back with two new devices and won an honoree award for innovation. They call their technology “bio-mimmetic pleasure devices” and their two key products are a G-spot massager called Onda and a clitoral stimulator called Baci. The original Osé remains available as well. 

Other popular devices are the Satisfyer and the OhMiBod as well as the Crave. Most are discrete and they ship in discreet packaging as well. There is even a device for men who suffer from premature ejaculation called Morari, which is a patch applied to the perineum. 

Most of these devices also connect to an app; doesn’t everything these days? The Satisfyer, a German product that is a clitoral stimulator, has an iPhone and Android app so you can manage the settings, including through voice! In future they say, you’ll be able to control it from your AppleWatch. You can even use a favourite song to determine the rhythm you want.

Where once such devices were relegated to side-street shops in the shady part of town or just considered part of the porn industry, pioneering women entrepreneurs have refused to be stopped and the curtains are being drawn back. Research increasingly shows that sexual health is important for stress relief, better sleep and even cervical health for women as well. We’ve even written about the benefits of sex before sleep.

Back to Crave, which has designed vibrators that look more like jewelry. One is a pendant that can hang around the neck and the other is a ring that can be used as an aid as well. Clever. Innovation is coming to life in this space.

These latest devices claim to have more science behind them as well, unlike the typical veiny, garish silicon penises of yore. They’re smooth or elegantly rippled and far more considerate of female anatomy than ever before. The overall market for sex tech is still growing, but we can expect to see more products emerging and more options for women. Sex is a part of our lives and it’s healthy. So is sexual expression. Stay tuned for more.

Author: Alexa Hurst is a staff writer for HUM@Nmedia and our Optimyz and Silver magazine brands, based in Nova Scotia.

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